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The Plan to Modernize Our Energy Infrastructure

 

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Tuesday, Vice President Joe Biden visited the city of Philadelphia to announce the plan to modernize the pipelines, waterways, wires, rails, and electric grids that make up our country’s energy infrastructure.

The plan, which stems from a study called the Quadrennial Energy Review, will focus on the distribution, storage, and transmission of crude oil, natural gas, and electricity. Many infrastructure systems around the U.S. (including the one in Philadelphia) are aging and because of this, they are having trouble keeping up with the change in climate, energy production, and cyber and physical threats.

The U.S. began increasing its oil and natural gas production in 2009 and since then, rails and waterways have become congested trying to transport these fuels. In addition, many fuel-carrying pipelines that were built in prior decades are prone to leaks and ruptures and our growing renewable energy sources are now more susceptible to cyber attacks.

To improve all of these issues, he Obama administration is proposing a cost of $3.5 billion over the course of 10 years in order to replace and restructure natural gas pipelines. The idea will be to offer states financial incentives to update their pipelines and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which would in turn, improve air quality and create jobs.

As far as the electrical grid goes, the administration is proposing $4 billion to modernize the electrical grid, and according to Philly.com, the energy department plans to partner with 17 chief utility executives in a program called Partnership for Energy Sector Climate Resilience to explore the ways we can potentially protect our electricity systems from extreme weather. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is also proposing a $72 million investment in new electrical infrastructures.

*This post is strictly to inform our customers regarding the latest in energy news. We at Oliver don’t offer a political opinion regarding the proposed measures. Any comments or questions about the proposal itself should be directed to our readers’ representatives.*