Category : maintenance

Water Heater Maintenance Facts You May Not Know

water heater maintenance

Your water heater is an important part of your home. Unfortunately, we often don’t realize it until one day, something goes wrong and we’re out of hot water. At Oliver, we suggest a water heater maintenance plan that can help keep your system running smoothly. We’ll evaluate your water heater on a regular basis to make sure it’s still in health and if not, we’ll fix it or replace it.

Here, we share some water heater maintenance facts you may not know:

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Why Trust Oliver for Your Heating Repairs

heating repairs

Heating repairs are never fun – especially if they happen in the dead of winter. At Oliver Heating, Cooling, Plumbing, & Electrical, we’re here for your repairs 24/7. From strange noises to uncommon sounds to too-little heat, we can figure out what’s wrong and get it back to right. Here’s why so many homeowners trust Oliver for their heating repairs:

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What to Know During Your Commercial Boiler Startup

boiler maintenance

It feels like winter is already here and if you haven’t yet started up your commercial boiler, you probably will soon. Boilers are great for keeping your space warm for the season, but they need regular boiler maintenance in order to operate properly. If you haven’t yet scheduled a check-up for your system, contact the professionals at Oliver. If your boiler is already good to go, here are some things to keep in mind during startup:

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6 Tips to Get Your Heater Ready for Winter

heating maintenance

As you know, the winter season can get pretty brutal in PA, NJ, and DE. From below-zero temperatures to feet of snow, it’s important to have a heater that works properly all season long. Here, our heating maintenance company shares some tips for preparing your heater so it can keep you warm when you need it most:

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Is Your Hot Water Heater Leaking?

water heater leaking

Have you noticed water around your water heater? Even if it’s a small trickle, your water heater may be leaking. At Oliver, we suggest addressing the issue quickly before it gets any worse. Contact our plumbing experts – we can determine exactly what’s going on and what needs to be done to stop your water heater leaking.

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The Importance of Generator Maintenance

generator maintenance

A generator is a great investment for your home – especially if you live in an area that experiences bad weather. Like other systems, you generator needs care in order to operate properly. Generator maintenance is an important part of owning a generator. At Oliver, our experts can help you schedule it on a regular basis.

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How the IoT Is Helping Colleges Save on Their HVAC Costs

HVAC contractor

Today, the Internet of Things is one of the most extensive and fascinating ideas for the modern world. The IoT joins together vehicles, home appliances, and devices using electronics, sensors, and software. This creates a network of elements that are interconnected – and the idea is only growing. In fact, experts estimate that the IoT will consist of around 30 billion objects by 2020.

As an HVAC contractor, we’re always interested in how new technology will affect the HVAC world. In this EdTech article, Alan Joch writes about how higher education institutions are using the IoT to save money on HVAC:

“Consider this scenario: A facilities engineer on a college campus discovers a failure in an HVAC controller that may cause the system to dump too much cold air into a room.

To compensate, the HVAC system reheats the extra cold air to maintain the desired comfort level, wasting energy and money in the process. The room’s occupants have no reason to contact facilities managers, which means technicians aren’t aware of the glitch.

Problems like this are common, costly and tough to solve. But institutions are starting to use the Internet of Things (IoT) — pairing connected sensors with analytics software — to fix them. And they’re saving big money in the process.

Energy engineers at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln were mindful of simultaneous heating and cooling issues when they implemented an environmental fault detection and diagnostics system two years ago. So, as they installed thousands of networked room sensors, they included an algorithm designed to spot HVAC breakdowns.

“Lo and behold, a room in the Law College showed up with the heating and cooling problem,” says Lalit Agarwal, the university’s director of utility and energy management.

Fixing the flawed air conditioner damper saved the university a modest $300 per year in excess energy costs. But the financial implications go well beyond that, Agarwal says: “Think about how many rooms we have on our campus. If just 5 percent of them have the same failure, we are looking at thousands of dollars a year in excess costs — for just one type of problem.”

In fact, by Agarwal’s estimate, data-driven energy management activities have yielded about $200,000 in cost-avoidance savings in one year. Those savings likely will grow as facilities engineers continue to combine IoT with other technologies to proactively address HVAC issues that waste energy.

Says Agarwal, “We’ve had instances where technicians show up to fix a classroom’s ventilation system, and the instructor says, ‘But I didn’t call for anybody.’ The technicians say, ‘We know, but you probably would have in a month.’”

IoT Optimizes HVAC Operations

IoT lets institutions collect heaps of data on energy usage and, just as importantly, analyze that data for wasteful consumption patterns and opportunities to optimize HVAC operations.

“Energy management is right up there among the most compelling applications for IoT because it often results in direct cost savings,” says Steve Hoffenberg, the director of industry analysis, IoT and embedded technology at VDC Research.

To reap these savings, institutions combine low-cost digital sensors with analytics software in on-premises systems or cloud services designed for Big Data. Some implementations use onsite gateways that, among other duties, filter raw data streams to keep extraneous information from clogging local area networks and analytics engines.

“Ideally, the analytics should be self-learning, so that it understands energy consumption patterns for a specific building and optimizes it based on actual usage, such as real-time occupancy,” Hoffenberg says.

On the horizon, he says, are energy-related IoT systems that mix building sensory data with third-party weather data to help facilities staff manage energy consumption based on prevailing environmental conditions.

Successful Deployment Requires Collaboration of IoT Stakeholders

The rewards of IoT can be significant, but Chuck Benson, assistant director for IT, facilities services, at the University of Washington, says stakeholders may need to align their priorities. “There needs to be a lot of coordination to get these departments to work together closely,” he says.

In particular, IT and operations staff tend to approach such projects in unique ways. “These professionals even see time differently: IT people are patching and changing systems on a daily and weekly basis. OT people think in terms of buildings that last decades,” Benson says. “It takes work, and regular meetings that start early in the process, to bring these two groups together.”

Increased Data Output Creates Troubleshooting Efficiencies

At Nebraska, the environmental fault detection and diagnostics implementation uses more than 60,000 sensors to monitor the campus’s HVAC and computerized maintenance management systems. An electronic dashboard displays summary data, including updated insights about energy consumption and alerts when HVAC performance dips.

“Engineers get enough information to see possible faults and get a starting point for determining potential causes,” Agarwal says.

Multiple databases support the platform, including those running Microsoft SQL and the open-source MariaDB technology. In addition, Agarwal and his staff are always on the lookout for innovations in data-driven energy management. “Cloud-based machine learning applications in Microsoft Azure and similar technologies may help systems learn how to reduce the time needed to identify HVAC faults,” Agarwal says. “That is definitely an area for us to investigate for the future.”

The university’s fault detection and diagnostics system also supports an ongoing building recommissioning project. So far, more than a dozen buildings have been reconditioned for energy efficiency.

“After we perform a full tuneup on HVAC equipment in older buildings, the IoT sensors, working in conjunction with the detection and diagnostics system, enable us to keep our eye on performance, so we can keep the systems running as optimally as possible over time,” Agarwal says.

Recommissioning has reduced overall energy consumption by 17 percent and counting, he adds. “We’ve addressed barely 10 percent of the 130 buildings, so we expect even greater savings as we continue on this path,” Agarwal says.”